likeafieldmouse:

Farkas Molnar - Konstruction (1921)

likeafieldmouse:

Farkas Molnar - Konstruction (1921)

663 notes

Sebastian Wickeroth

(Source: from89)

80 notes


Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett

Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett

(Source: sforzinda, via tourettesyndrome)

6,497 notes

artruby:

Glass sculpture by Ardan Özmenoğlu.

(via tourettesyndrome)

3,003 notes

"The crucial thing is to find a truth which is truth for me, to find the idea for which I am willing to live and die."

Soren Kierkegaard (via katuytiepo)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

1,154 notes

dabacahin:

The reality of a room
“The Taoists claimed that the comedy of life could be made more interesting if everyone would preserve the unities. To keep the proportion of things and give place to others without losing one’s own position was the secret of success in the mundane drama. We must know the whole play in order to properly act our parts; the conception of totality must never be lost in that of the individual. This Lao Tzu illustrates by his favourite metaphor of the Vacuum. He claimed that only in vacuum lay the truly essential. The reality of a room, for instance, was to be found in the vacant space enclosed by the roof and the walls, not in the roof and walls themselves. The usefulness of a water pitcher dwelt in the emptiness where water might be put, not in the form of the pitcher or the material of which it was made. Vacuum is all-potent because all-containing. In vacuum alone motion becomes possible. One who could make of himself a vacuum into which others might freely enter would become master of all situations. The whole can always dominate the part.”
— from The Book of Tea (Chapter III, “Taoism and Zennism”) by Kakuzo Okakura 
(Photograph: “Old Japanese Tatami Room” by Yuji Hirayama. Thank you, Mr. Hirayama and flickr.)

dabacahin:

The reality of a room

“The Taoists claimed that the comedy of life could be made more interesting if everyone would preserve the unities. To keep the proportion of things and give place to others without losing one’s own position was the secret of success in the mundane drama. We must know the whole play in order to properly act our parts; the conception of totality must never be lost in that of the individual. This Lao Tzu illustrates by his favourite metaphor of the Vacuum. He claimed that only in vacuum lay the truly essential. The reality of a room, for instance, was to be found in the vacant space enclosed by the roof and the walls, not in the roof and walls themselves. The usefulness of a water pitcher dwelt in the emptiness where water might be put, not in the form of the pitcher or the material of which it was made. Vacuum is all-potent because all-containing. In vacuum alone motion becomes possible. One who could make of himself a vacuum into which others might freely enter would become master of all situations. The whole can always dominate the part.”

— from The Book of Tea (Chapter III, “Taoism and Zennism”) by Kakuzo Okakura

(Photograph: “Old Japanese Tatami Room” by Yuji Hirayama. Thank you, Mr. Hirayama and flickr.)

3 notes

"I am so fed up and joyless that not only have I nothing to fill my soul, I cannot even conceive of anything that could possibly satisfy it - alas, not even the bliss of heaven."

Søren Kierkegaard (via deaths-and-entrances)

(Source: thewideoceans, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

783 notes

"Conventional scientific discourse privileges the sensible field in abstraction from sensory experience, and commonly maintains that subjective experience is ‘caused’ by an objectifiable set of processes in the mechanically determined field of the sensible. Meanwhile, New Age spiritualism regularly privileges pure sentience, or subjectivity, in abstraction from sensible matter, and often maintains that material reality is itself an illusory effect caused by an immaterial mind or spirit. Although commonly seen as opposed world-views, both of these positions assume a qualitative difference between the sentient and the sensed; by prioritizing one or the other, both of these views perpetuate the distinction between human ‘subjects’ and natural ‘objects,’ and hence neither threatens the common conception of sensible nature as a purely passive dimension suitable for human manipulation and use. While both of these views are unstable, each bolsters the other; by bouncing from one to the other—from scientific determinism to spiritual idealism and back again—contemporary discourse easily avoids the possibility that both the perceiving being and the perceived being are of the same stuff, that the perceiver and the perceived are interdependent and in some sense even reversible aspects of a common animate element, or Flesh, that is at once both sensible and sensitive."

David Abram, The Spell of the Sensuous (via crematedadolescent)


(via s33)

38 notes

tatecollectives:

We like.
inspirimgrafik:

http://www.andreaspikker.com/

tatecollectives:

We like.

inspirimgrafik:

http://www.andreaspikker.com/

107 notes

"Are not the mountains, waves and skies, a part
Of me and of my soul, as I of them?"

Lord Byron (via outonthesea)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via suffering-in-the-labyrinth)

4,198 notes